Right Now Poetry and Fiction Competition – Shortlists and Winners Announced

By Right Now
writing on notepad

Our first Poetry and Fiction competition has drawn to a close. We received an overwhelming number of submissions and thank everyone who submitted their creative work. We would like to congratulate all shortlisted writers – their works are listed here in no particular order.

Poetry:

They Leave by Night, by Sharon Hammad

Number 631, by Robert Verdon

Hope Road, by Kathleen McLeod

The Long House, by TM Collins

No Asians. Your desire, by Jake Dennis

The Single Father, by Tiggy Johnson

Another World, by Margaret Ruckert

Borderlands, by Hayley Elliott-Ryan

Fiction:

Wednesday is Cooking Day, by Laura McPhee-Browne

Short Story ideas about Violence, After Doris Lessing, by Sam Wilson

Anna Be Quick, by Jamie Derkenne

Akinyi Martha (full stop), by Filipa Bellette

Sediment, by Alice Bishop

After, by Christy Collins

Here are the Dogs, by Laura McPhee-Browne

Hard Rubbish, by Rose Hartley

All shortlisted pieces will be published on the website;  one poem and one short story every Friday from mid-March to mid-May. Be sure to check this page for links to read these incredible works.

Additionally, we will now announce the competition winners and runners up:

Poetry Winner: No Asians. Your desire, by Jake Dennis

Poetry Runner Up: Number 631 by Robert Verdon

Fiction Winner: Akinyi Martha, by Filipa Bellette

Fiction Runners Up: Hard Rubbish, by Rose Hartley; and
Short Story Ideas about Violence, After Doris Lessing, by Sam Wilson

Congratulations to our winners and runners up. Our winners are the recipients of $500 in prizemoney and will be published in the upcoming Right Now anthology. Our runners up will also be published in the anthology and will be awarded $100. We hope you can celebrate these creative pieces with us at the launch of the anthology, around 29 May 2014.

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